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The lines of demarcation of Pope Alexander VI and the Treaty of Tordesillas A.D. 1493 and 1494

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Published by For sale by J. Hope in Ottawa .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Samuel Edward Dawson
ContributionsRoyal Society of Canada
Classifications
LC ClassificationsE129.C1 D26
The Physical Object
Pagination467-546 p. :
Number of Pages546
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24388157M

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  Excerpt from The Lines of Demarcation of Pope Alexander Vi. And the Treaty of Tordesillas A. D. and Extension, for, translated into the very latest diplomatic form of Speech, it was nothing else than the delimitation of Spheres of influence. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic : $ Title: The Lines of Demarcation of Pope Alexander VI and Treaty of Tordesillas, A.D. and Volume 5, Issue 2 of Royal Society of Canada, 2. ser., Full text of "The lines of demarcation of Pope Alexander VI and the Treaty of Tordesillas A.D. and " See other formats.   The lines of demarcation of Pope Alexander VI and the Treaty of Tordesillas A.D. and by Dawson, Samuel Edward, ; Royal Society of CanadaPages:

  The Line of Demarcation of Pope Alexander VI, in A.D. and That of the Treaty of Tordesillas in A.D. With an Inquiry Concerning the Metrolog (Paperback or Softback). The Line of Demarcation between Spanish and Portuguese territory was first defined by Pope Alexander VI () and was later revised by the Treaty of Tordesillas (). Spain won control of lands discovered west of the line, while Portugal gained rights to new lands to the east. So, in , a treaty named after the Spanish town in which it was stipulated was signed in Tordesillas. The Treaty of Tordesillas maintained the north-south line Alexander had drawn but moved it miles (1, km) farther west. Supposedly, all Africa and Asia now “belonged” to . Tordesillas, Treaty of Map showing the line of demarcation between Spanish and Portuguese territory, as first defined by Pope Alexander VI () and later revised by the Treaty of Tordesillas (). Spain won control of lands discovered west of the line, while Portugal gained rights to new lands to .

Representatives of both kingdoms met with the participation of Alexander VI in Tordesillas in and the demarcation line was moved for liq away from Azores (for km towards the west from those islands) according to the next treaty concluded on June 7. Inter caetera ('Among other [works]') was a papal bull issued by Pope Alexander VI on the 4 May (quarto nonas maii) , which granted to the Catholic Monarchs Ferdinand and Isabella (as sovereigns of Castile) all lands to the "west and south" of a pole-to-pole line leagues west and south of any of the islands of the Azores or the Cape Verde islands. The Papal Bull "Inter Caetera," issued by Pope Alexander VI on May 4, , played a central role in the Spanish conquest of the New World. The document supported Spain’s strategy to ensure its exclusive right to the lands discovered by Columbus the previous year. Line of Demarcation () Line of Demarcation (), papal donation of temporal authority in the Indies to the Spanish crown. Following the successful completion of Christopher Columbus's first voyage to the New World, Pope Alexander VI (a Spaniard) extended to the crown of Castile by a series of bulls (May-September ) dominion over all those lands and peoples to the west of a meridian.