Conservation of a Sacred Object.
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Conservation of a Sacred Object.

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Published .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Thesis (M.A.)--Camberwell College of Arts, 1992.

The Physical Object
Pagination83 p. :
Number of Pages83
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19730525M

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  Sacred Objects, Sacred Places combines native oral histories, photographs, drawings, and case studies to present current issues of cultural preservation vital to American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians. Complete with commentaries by native peoples, non-native curators, and archaeologists, this book discusses the repatriation of human remains, the curation and exhibition of Cited by: In library and archival science, preservation is a set of activities aimed at prolonging the life of a record, book, or object while making as few changes as possible. Preservation activities vary widely and may include monitoring the condition of items, maintaining the temperature and humidity in collection storage areas, writing a plan in case of emergencies, digitizing items, writing. In conclusion, an appropriate course of action and a legitimate treatment option with regard to the conservation of Native North American sacred art or artifacts is well-informed and carefully considered non-intervention, with conservators familiarizing themselves as far as is appropriate with the non-physical attributes of the object, and its. Conservation and restoration of metals is the activity devoted to the protection and preservation of historical (religious, artistic, technical and ethnographic) and archaeological objects made partly or entirely of it are included all activities aimed at preventing or slowing deterioration of items, as well as improving accessibility and readability of the objects of cultural heritage.

Ceremonial object, any object used in a ritual or a religious ceremony. Throughout the history of religions and cultures, objects used in cults, rituals, and sacred ceremonies have almost always been of both utilitarian and symbolic natures. Ceremonial and ritualistic objects have been utilized as. The Journal of Conservation and Museum Studies is fully peer reviewed and Open Access. It contains research on conservation science, artefact studies, restoration, museum studies, environment studies, collection management and curation. Published from the UCL Institute of Archaeology from to , the journal was relaunched in in collaboration with the British Library, with a newly.   Books Are Not Sacred Objects Rebecca Joines Schinsky The bookish internet exploded last week when, in what one report called “ the worst craft idea ever,” Lauren Conrad (star of MTV reality shows and author of teen novels) cut apart a set of Lemony Snicket books and used the spines to decorate an otherwise plain : Rebecca Joines Schinsky.   The massive, 20,pound bronze front doors of St. Patrick’s Cathedral were recently re-installed after a three-month conservation and restoration project completed by G & L Popian Inc., an architectural restoration form.. A massive, masterful Gothic structure, St. Patrick’s is the seat of New York’s Roman Catholic Archdiocese and has been the city’s focal point of Catholic worship.

The management of ecosystems is the object of long-standing, cross-disciplinary debates, both in practice and in academia, and originated in defining the objectives needed to locally harness the conservation of species and preservation of ecosystems. It resulted in extensive inquiry into the institutional arrangements that define the. Conservation meets these aims by using the ‘V&A’s Conservation Ethics Check List’. (2) Conservators reflect on why work is being undertaken, its implications now and in the future and the effects of the treatment on the value of the object. This ‘value’ may be of .   To celebrate Book Riot’s second birthday on Monday, we’re running some of our favorite posts from our first two years. _____ The bookish internet exploded last week when, in what one report called “the worst craft idea ever,” Lauren Conrad (star of MTV reality shows and author of teen novels) cut apart a set of Lemony Snicket books and used the spines to decorate an otherwise plain box.   Bringing together religious studies scholars and museum curators, Sacred Objects in Secular Spaces is the first volume to focus on Asian religions in relation to these questions. The contributors analyze an array of issues related to the exhibition in museums of objects of religious significance from Hindu, Buddhist, and Sikh traditions.